Spoken Language – Posh!

http://web.aqa.org.uk/presentation/english/spoken-language-resource/

http://www.guardian.co.uk/books/2002/dec/05/poetry

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/technology/tech-news/is-texting-making-us-more-creative-canadian-researchers-think-so/article4098701/

Controlled Assessment Task Banks for GCSE English Language Unit 3 part c: Spoken Language study

Social attitudes to spoken language:

  • Explore some aspects of the ways your speech changes according to the context you are in.
  • Investigate speech that is particular to a community.(Community can be seen in many ways by: region; kin; gender; ethnicity; religion etc.)

Spoken genres:

  • Explore some aspects of the ways face-to-face conversation (‘real’ rather than ‘fictional’) works in the media. (‘face-to-face’ may be inferred on radio)
  • Investigate the ways spoken language is used by any kind of television presenter, such as TV chef(s), weather forecaster(s), news reader(s), sports commentators.

Multi- modal talk:

  • Explore different social attitudes to the ways digital communications are affecting language
  • Explore the view that texting and/or web-based interactions can be very creative forms of language use

Controlled Assessment Criteria
A02

  • Understand variations in spoken language, explaining why language changes in relation to contexts.
  • Evaluate the impact of spoken language choices in their own and others’ use.

Band 5 Candidates demonstrate (17–20)
‘Sophisticated, perceptive analysis and evaluation of aspects of how they and others use and adapt spoken language for specific purposes. Impressive’ sustained and sophisticated interpretations of key features found in spoken language data
marks sophisticated analysis and evaluation of key issues arising from public attitudes to spoken language varieties.

Band 4 Candidates demonstrate (13–16)
‘Confident, confident explanation and analysis of how they and others use and adapt spoken language for specific purposes
Assured’ confident analysis and reflection on features found in some spoken language data
marks confident analysis of some issues arising from public attitudes to spoken language varieties.

Band 3 Candidates demonstrate (9–12)
‘Clear, Consistent’ explanation of how they and others use and adapt spoken language for specific purposes,
exploration of features found in some spoken language data’
exploration of some issues arising from public attitudes to spoken language varieties.

Band 2 Candidates demonstrate  (5-8)
‘Some’ some awareness of how they and others use and adapt spoken language for specific purposes
some understanding of significant features found in some spoken language data
some awareness of public attitudes to spoken language varieties.

Band 1 Candidates demonstrate (1–4)
‘Limited’ limited awareness of how they and others use and adapt spoken language for specific purposes
description of a limited range of features to be found in some spoken language data
limited awareness of public attitudes to spoken language varieties.

Notes:
1. The phrase ‘spoken language’ here refers to the range of texts which are possible in each of the three categories.
2. Data here can take different forms, such as transcripts, recordings, journalism etc.

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